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Northern Cordillera forests (WWF ecoregion NA0613) View National Geographic WildWorld profile,(WildWorld home), View  WWF Wildfinder animal species list (WildFinder home)

Forest between Watson Lake and Teslin Lake, northern British Columbia
Forest between Watson Lake and Teslin Lake, northern British Columbia
(c) 2005 Scott and Ruth Bassett

Northern Cordillera forests map
Source of bioregions data: Olson, D. M. and E. Dinerstein. The Global 200: Priority ecoregions for global conservation. (PDF file) Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 89:125-126.

Distinctiveness (1=highest,4=lowest): 1 (globally outstanding)
This ecoregion contains a large, intact population of large mammals, including an intact predator=prey system.*

Conservation Status (1=most endangered, 5=most intact): 3 (vulnerable)
About 85% of the ecoregion remains intact.  Mining, logging hydroelectric development, and transportation corridors are threats.*

Characteristic species*
 
Betula spp. (dwarf birch)
Salix spp. (willows)
Abies lasiocarpa  (subalpine fir)

Picea mariana (black spruce) (c) 2004 Maurice J. Kaurmann

Picea glauca  (white spruce)
Picea engelmannii  (Engelmann spruce)
Pinus contorta  (lodgepole pine)

Betula papyrifera (paper birch)

Populus tremuloides  (quaking aspen)

Associated habitats
 

River and forest, northern British Columbia

Braided river, northern British Columbia Ft. Nelson River, northern British Columbia
left: Braided river, between Muncho Lake Prov. Park and Ft. Nelson, right: Ft. Nelson River (c) 2005 Scott and Ruth Bassett   hires   hires

Forest, northern British Columbia

Forest, northern British Columbia
(c) 2005 Scott and Ruth Bassett   hires

Liard Hot Springs, northern British Columbia

Laird Hot Springs, northern British Columbia Laird Hot Springs, northern British Columbia
The warm microclimate caused by the hot springs provides an island of habitat for plants normally found hundreds of miles to the south. (c) 2005 Scott and Ruth Bassett   hires   hires

* Ricketts, T.H., E. Dinerstein, D.M. Olson, C.J. Loucks, et al.  (1999) Terrestrial Ecoregions of North America: A Conservation Assessment.  World Wildlife Fund - United States and Canada.  Island Press, Washington, D.C. pp. 358-360.

Except as noted, images copyright 2002-2005 Steve Baskauf - Terms of use