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Colorado Plateau Shrublands (WWF ecoregion NA1304) View National Geographic WildWorld profile (WildWorld home), View  WWF Wildfinder animal species list (WildFinder home)

Pinyon pine and juniper shrublands, south rim, Grand Canyon Ntl. Park, AZ
Pinus edulis (pinyon pine) and Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) shrublands, south rim, Grand Canyon Ntl. Park, Arizona


Source of bioregions data: Olson, D. M. and E. Dinerstein. The Global 200: Priority ecoregions for global conservation. (PDF file) Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 89:125-126.

Distinctiveness (1=highest,4=lowest): 2 (regionally outstanding)
Large mountain rivers flow through exposed sandstone, creating large canyons.  The ecoregion is rich in endemic fish and insect species.*

Conservation Status (1=most endangered, 5=most intact): 4 (relatively stable)
About 15% of the ecoregion remains intact.  Overgrazing is the primary reason for habitat loss, with mineral extraction, damming, off-road vehicle use, and urbanization as other threats.*

Characteristic species*
Pinus edulis (pinyon pine)
Juniperus spp. (juniper)
Artemisia tridentata  (big sagebrush)
Cercocarpus montanus (alderleaf cercocarpus)

some Arizona plants
For additional images of northern Arizona plants, see Northern Arizona Flora

Associated habitats

Riparian habitat


Populus spp. along Rio Grande River, Del Norte, Colorado (c) 2004 Maurice J. Kaurmann  hires

 

Artemisia (sage) desert


Artemisia spp. (sage) with Pinus edulis (pinyon pine) and Juniperus spp. (juniper) along a river, near Taos, New Mexico
(c) 2004 Maurice J. Kaurmann  hires


Snake River valley, Grand Tetons Ntl. Park, Wyoming (c) 2004 Maurice J. Kaurmann  hires

 

South rim, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona


(left) Pinus edulis (pinyon pine) and Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) shrublands. (right) Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper)  hires  hires


Variation in elevation results in a range of habitats, from pine woodlands on the Kaibab plateau, to desert at the canyon floor  hires  hires

 

Kaibab Plateau, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Kaibab Plateau, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Kaibab Plateau, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
 (c) 2005 Daniel P. Duran   hires   hires

 

Grasslands, north of Grand Canyon Ntl. Park, AZ

Grasslands, north of Grand Canyon Ntl. Park, AZ Grasslands, north of Grand Canyon Ntl. Park, AZ
 (c) 2005 Daniel P. Duran   hires   hires

 

Desert, east-central Utah

Desert, east-central Utah Desert, east-central Utah Desert, east-central Utah
 (c) 2005 Daniel P. Duran   hires   hires   hires

 

Montaine forest, Magdelena Mountains, New Mexico

Magdelena Mountains, New Mexico Magdelena Mountains, New Mexico
 (c) 2005 Daniel P. Duran   hires   hires

 

Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado


(c) 2004 Maurice J. Kaurmann  hires  hires

 

* Ricketts, T.H., E. Dinerstein, D.M. Olson, C.J. Loucks, et al.  (1999) Terrestrial Ecoregions of North America: A Conservation Assessment.  World Wildlife Fund - United States and Canada.  Island Press, Washington, D.C. pp. 332-335.

Except as noted, images copyright 2002-2004 Steve Baskauf - Terms of use