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Upper Midwest forest-savanna transition (WWF ecoregion NA0415) View National Geographic WildWorld profile,(WildWorld home), View  WWF Wildfinder animal species list (WildFinder home)

oak savanna, Cedar Creek Natural History Area, Minnesota
savanna, Cedar Creek Natural History Area (Long-term Ecological Research), Minnesota
(c) 2005 Ron E. VanNimwegen


Source of bioregions data: Olson, D. M. and E. Dinerstein. The Global 200: Priority ecoregions for global conservation. (PDF file) Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 89:125-126.

Distinctiveness (1=highest,4=lowest): 4 (nationally important)
This ecoregion contains the last concentration of black soil tall-grass savanna in the United States.*

Conservation Status (1=most endangered, 5=most intact): 1 (critical)
Less than 5% of the habitat in this ecoregion remains intact.  Nearly all of the oak savanna in the ecoregion has been destroyed by conversion to agriculture.  Remaining semi-natural habitat suffers invasion of woody shrubs due to fire supression.*

Characteristic species*
 
Quercus (oak)species

Associated habitats

Minnesota oak savanna
oak savanna, Anoka Co., Minnesota (c) 2005 Jason J. Husveth  hires

Wisconsin Dells riparian forest
riparian forest, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin (c) 2005 James H. Bassett  hires

Minnesota black ash hardwood swamp
black ash (hardwood) swamp, Hennepin Co., Minnesota (c) 2005 Jason J. Husveth  hires

Lake sedge meadow
lake sedge meadow, Hennepin Co., Minnesota (c) 2005 Jason J. Husveth  hires

Wet prairie - rich fen
wet prairie - rich fen, Anoka Co., Minnesota (c) 2005 Jason J. Husveth  hires

* Ricketts, T.H., E. Dinerstein, D.M. Olson, C.J. Loucks, et al.  (1999) Terrestrial Ecoregions of North America: A Conservation Assessment.  World Wildlife Fund - United States and Canada.  Island Press, Washington, D.C. pp. 164-166.

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