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Southeastern mixed forests (WWF ecoregion NA0413) View National Geographic WildWorld profile,(WildWorld home), View  WWF Wildfinder animal species list (WildFinder home)

Sumter National Forest, South Carolina
Sumter National Forest, South Carolina
(c) 2008 Steven J. Baskauf


Source of bioregions data: Olson, D. M. and E. Dinerstein. The Global 200: Priority ecoregions for global conservation. (PDF file) Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 89:125-126.

Distinctiveness (1=highest,4=lowest): 1 (globally outstanding)
The freshwater ecosystems in this ecoregion are among the richest in the temperate latitudes.  The ecoregion is a center of gastropod diversity and is rich in amphibian, reptile, bird and shrub species.  It has a high number of endemic reptiles, amphibians, butterflies, and mammals.*

Conservation Status (1=most endangered, 5=most intact):  1 (critical)
99% of the habitat has been converted to agriculture or other uses.*

Characteristic species*
 
Pinus palustris (longleaf pine) (c) 2005 Lisa Kelly
Pinus echinata (shortleaf pine)
Pinus taeda (loblolly pine)
Quercus species (oaks)
Carya species (hickories)
Cornus species
Cercis canadensis (redbud)
Juniperus species
Ilex opaca (American holly)

Some associated habitats

Piedmont, northwestern South Carolina
Piedmont, northwestern South Carolina Piedmont, northwestern South Carolina
The Appalachian Mountains are visible in the background.  (c) 2008 Steven J. Baskauf  hires  hires
 
Sumter National Forest, South Carolina
Sumter National Forest South Carolina Sumter National Forest South Carolina Sumpter National Forest South Carolina Sumpter National Forest South Carolina
  (c) 2008 Steven J. Baskauf  hires  hires  hires  hires
 
roadside forest near Meridian, Mississippi
forest near Meridian, Mississippi forest near Meridian, Mississippi
  (c) 2011 Steven J. Baskauf  hires  hires
Granite outcrop, northeast Georgia

Granite outcrops are among the few habitats in good condition in this ecoregion.  Sabatia quadrangula is shown here.  (c) 2005 Katherine Gould Mathews  hires

* Ricketts, T.H., E. Dinerstein, D.M. Olson, C.J. Loucks, et al.  (1999) Terrestrial Ecoregions of North America: A Conservation Assessment.  World Wildlife Fund - United States and Canada.  Island Press, Washington, D.C. pp. 164-166.

Except as noted, images copyright 2002-2004 Steve Baskauf - Terms of use